Posts made in September, 2007

Blog: NO SERVICES THIS WEEKEND!

Posted by on Sep 19, 2007 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Don’t forget it is Tapestry Leader’s Refreshing weekend! There will be NO weekend services! Friday night Bible Study is cancelled – Sept. 21Saturday night worship practice is cancelled – Sept 22… Original post by Dustin Hedrick and software by Elliott Back Copyright © 2007 the Tapestry Church. This Feed is for personal non-commercial use only.Plugin by...

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NO SERVICES THIS WEEKEND!

Posted by on Sep 19, 2007 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Full Thread is Below Go to the Blog NO SERVICES THIS WEEKEND! Don’t forget it is Tapestry Leader’s Refreshing weekend! There will be NO weekend services! Friday night Bible Study is cancelled – Sept. 21Saturday night worship practice is cancelled – Sept 22Sunday services are cancelled – Sept 23 HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND and we will see you next week! Blessings!pd Author: Dustin on Sept 19, 2007 at 4:20 PM.   Reply in the Blog Privacy Policy Report Inappropriate Use Your whole life. Organized....

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No DC Underground this week, Friday 9/21/07

Posted by on Sep 17, 2007 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

We will NOT have DC Underground this week. The leaders are headed to North Carolina for their annual Refreshing. We will resume bible study the following week. Privacy Policy Report Inappropriate Use Your whole life. Organized....

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Sinners in the Hands of an Angry GOD – by Johnathan Edwards

Posted by on Sep 9, 2007 in d-f, Johnathan Edwards | 0 comments

SINNERS IN THE HANDS OF AN ANGRY GOD by Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758) Enfield, Connecticut July 8, 1741 –Their foot shall slide in due time– Deut. xxxii. 35 In this verse is threatened the vengeance of God on the wicked unbelieving Israelites, who were God’s visible people, and who lived under the means of grace; but who, notwithstanding all God’s wonderful works towards them, remained (as ver. 28.) void of counsel, having no understanding in them. Under all the cultivations of heaven, they brought forth bitter and poisonous fruit; as in the two verses next preceding the text. The expression I have chosen for my text, Their foot shall slide in due time, seems to imply the following doings, relating to the punishment and destruction to which these wicked Israelites were exposed. 1. That they were always exposed to destruction; as one that stands or walks in slippery places is always exposed to fall. This is implied in the manner of their destruction coming upon them, being represented by their foot sliding. The same is expressed, Psalm 73:18. “Surely thou didst set them in slippery places; thou castedst them down into destruction.” 2. It implies, that they were always exposed to sudden unexpected destruction. As he that walks in slippery places is every moment liable to fall, he cannot foresee one moment whether he shall stand or fall the next; and when he does fall, he falls at once without warning: Which is also expressed in Psalm 73:18, 19. “Surely thou didst set them in slippery places; thou castedst them down into destruction: How are they brought into desolation as in a moment!” 3. Another thing implied is, that they are liable to fall of themselves, without being thrown down by the hand of another; as he that stands or walks on slippery ground needs nothing but his own weight to throw him down. 4. That the reason why they are not fallen already, and do not fall now, is only that God’s appointed time is not come. For it is said, that when that due time, or appointed time comes, their foot shall slide. Then they shall be left to fall, as they are inclined by their own weight. God will not hold them up in these slippery places any longer, but will let them go; and then at that very instant, they shall fall into destruction; as he that stands on such slippery declining ground, on the edge of a pit, he cannot stand alone, when he is let go he immediately falls and is lost. The observation from the words that I would now insist upon is this. “There is nothing that keeps wicked men at any one moment out of hell, but the mere pleasure of God.” By the mere pleasure of God, I mean his sovereign pleasure, his arbitrary will, restrained by no obligation, hindered by no manner of difficulty, any more than if nothing else but God’s mere will had in the least degree, or in any respect whatsoever, any hand in the preservation of wicked men one moment. The truth of this observation may appear by the following considerations. 1. There is no want of power in God to cast wicked men into hell at any moment. Men’s hands cannot be strong when God rises up. The strongest have no power to resist him, nor can any deliver out of his hands.-He is not only able to cast wicked men into hell, but he can most easily do it. Sometimes an earthly prince meets with a great deal of difficulty to subdue a rebel, who has found means to fortify himself, and has made himself strong by the numbers of his followers. But it is not so with God. There is no fortress that is any defence from the power of God. Though hand join in hand, and vast multitudes of God’s enemies combine and associate themselves, they are easily broken in pieces. They are as great heaps of light chaff before the whirlwind; or large quantities of dry stubble before devouring flames....

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The Surprising Work pf GOD – Johnathan Edwards

Posted by on Sep 9, 2007 in d-f, Johnathan Edwards | 0 comments

A Faithful Narrative of the Surprising Work of God by Jonathan Edwards CONTNETS: I. A General Introductory Statement, II. The Manner of Conversions Various, Yet Bearing a Great Analogy, III. This Work Further Illustrated in Particular Instances. Rev. and Honored Sir, Having seen your letter to my honored Uncle Williams of Hatfield, of July 20, wherein you inform him of the notice that has been taken of the late wonderful work of God, in this and some other towns in this country, by the Rev. Dr. Watts, and Dr. Guyse, of London, and the congregation to which the last of these preached on a monthly day of solemn prayer; also, of your desire to be more perfectly acquainted with it, by some of us on the spot: and having been since informed by my Uncle Williams that you desire me to undertake it, I would now do it, in a just and faithful a manner as in me lies. SECTION I. A General Introductory Statement The people of the country, in general, I suppose, are as sober, orderly, and good sort of people, as in any part of New England; and I believe they have been preserved the freest by far of any part of the country, from error, and variety of sects and opinions. Our being so far within the land, at a distance from sea-ports, and in a corner of the country, has doubtless been one reason why we have not been so much corrupted with vice, as most other parts. But without question, the religion and good order of the county, and purity in doctrine, has, under God, been very much owing to the great abilities, and eminent piety of my venerable and honored grandfather Stoddard. I suppose we have been the freest of any part of the land from unhappy divisions and quarrels in our ecclesiastical and religious affairs, till the late lamentable Springfield contention. [The Springfield Contention relates to the settlement of a minister there, which occasioned too warm debates between some, both pastors and people, that were for it, and others that were against it, on account of their different apprehensions about his principles, and about some steps that were taken to procure his ordination.] Being much separated from other parts of the province and having comparatively but little intercourse with them, we have always managed our ecclesiastical affairs within ourselves. It is the way in which the country, from its infancy, has gone on, by the practical agreement of all; and the way in which our peace and good order has hitherto been maintained. The town of Northampton is of about 82 years standing, and has now about 200 families; which mostly dwell more compactly together than any town of such a size in these parts of the country. This probably has been an occasion, that both our corruptions and reformations have been, from time to time, the more swiftly propagated from one to another through the town. Take the town in general, and so far as I can judge, they are as rational and intelligent a people as most I have been acquainted with. Many of them have been noted for religion; and particularly remarkable for their distinct knowledge in things that relate to heart religion, and Christian experience, and their great regards thereto. I am the third minister who has been settled in the town. The Rev. Mr. Eleazer Mather, who was the first, was ordained in July, 1669. He was one whose heart was much in his work, and abundant in labors for the good of precious souls. He had the high esteem and great love for his people, and was blessed with no small success. The Rev. Mr. Stoddard who succeeded him, came first to the town the November after his death; but was not ordained till September 11, 1672, and died February 11, 1728-9. So that he continued in the work of the ministry here, from his first coming to town, near 60 years. And as he was eminent and renowned for his gifts and grace; so...

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